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Community Milestones
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Community Milestones

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Achievers

JoAnna Stevens, a resident of State Road, has been named to the Bob Jones University Symphonic Wind Band. Stevens is a sophomore majoring in music.

The Symphonic Wind Band is the university’s top-performing instrumental ensemble. Each year, performers audition by playing a group of excerpts taken from band literature or study etudes, scales and sight reading unfamiliar music. Following that selection audition, a second audition is held for seating within the ensemble.

Also, the university recently named Vivian Waite of Winston-Salem to the Lyric Choir, the university’s all-women music ensemble. Waite is a freshman majoring in English.

Auditions are held at the beginning of each semester and are open to both music and non-music majors.

Announcements

Preservation Forsyth, in partnership with Aperture Cinema, Senior Services, Friends of Oddfellows Cemetery, Happy Hill Cemetery Friends and the William C. Sims Center, will offer viewings of “Unmarked,” a documentary about historic and disadvantaged African American cemeteries.

The film will be shown at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29, at the William C. Sims Recreation Center, 1201 Alder St. in Winston-Salem, and 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30, at Senior Services of Winston-Salem, 2895 Shorefair Drive NW. Cemetery tours with members of each caretaker organization are available at 6 p.m.

“We started this project after watching a recent series on FOX8, “Forgotten Souls of Black Cemeteries,” which highlighted the impediments to preserving Forsyth County’s African American cemeteries,” said Martha Canipe, board member of Preservation Forsyth. “Our goal is to initiate a countywide community discussion as a way to bring public awareness to this issue, generate support for the individuals and organizations trying to repair, preserve, and restore these cemeteries and recruit volunteers to help with individual sites.”

Prior to the Wednesday screening, the audience is invited to tour historic Happy Hill Cemetery, much of which was destroyed by the construction of U.S. 52. Damage to the cemetery and plans for repairs will be discussed by Happy Hill Cemetery Friends. There will also be a display of artifacts near the William C. Sims Center. Parking will be available directly across the street.

Prior to the Thursday screening, the audience is invited to tour the historic Oddfellows Cemetery, which is normally closed to the public. Friends of Oddfellows Cemetery will be on hand for a discussion of strategies for much needed repairs and artifacts will be on display. Parking will be available to the rear of the Senior Services parking lot where the film will be shown.

Patrons should bring seating for each event and concessions will be available at both events.

For information about the film, visit www.unmarkedfilm.com.

To learn more about Preservation Forsyth and how to help protect historic buildings and sites, visit www.preservationforsyth.org or call 336-970-7491.

* * * *

More than 6.5 tons of donations are en route to Culp’s production facilities in Ouanaminthe, Haiti, for distribution to earthquake victims in affected areas of the country. Culp led a communitywide “Hands in for Haiti” donation drive, which began immediately after the earthquake on Aug. 14. Culp’s facilities are not located near the epicenter of the quake, and the company did not sustain any damage or harm to its facilities or employees. However, many Culp employees have family members who have been affected by the disaster.

To follow the journey of the “Hands in for Haiti” donations or find ways to be a part of the Culp family, find Culp on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn or go to www.CULP.com.

* * * *

Tony Fragola will teach a six-week course, The Art of Tai Chi Chuan, from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 6-Nov. 17, at the Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden in Kernersville. There will be no class on Oct. 20.

Designed for beginner and mid-level practitioners, the course is part of the Garden’s “Meditation and Mindfulness” series, an educational program focused on physical, mental and spiritual well-being.

Fragola is professor emeritus of media studies at UNCG. He is certified to teach Tai Chi for arthritis, both standing and sitting.

The fee for the course is $100 for garden members and $120 for non-members. Advance registration is required; visit www.cienerbotanicalgarden.org.

Grants

The Davie Family YMCA was awarded a 21st Century Community Learning Centers Grant worth $1.2 million over the next three years, which will help achieve educational equity.

This grant will serve 200 students at Cooleemee and Cornatzer Elementary Schools, as well as North and South Davie Middle Schools for after school and summer education programming. This will be done through a program called Access Academy, done in partnership with Davie County Schools.

Access Academy will provide social and emotional learning support, targeted academic interventions, and summer learning loss programming for students. The purpose of this program is to address socioeconomic disparities in education, ensuring every child regardless of income or background can learn, grow, and thrive while providing pathways to high school graduation and post secondary opportunities.

* * * *

The High Point Arts Council is accepting grant applications through Nov. 9 from nonprofit organizations for Community Arts Projects that benefit members of our community.

Each year grassroots funds are allocated to the Arts Council on a per capita basis from the North Carolina Arts Council. Approximately $8,000 will be awarded this year for Community Arts Projects in High Point.

Community Arts Project applications will be evaluated based on:

Artistic and programmatic merit

Benefit to audiences/participants

Responsiveness to community needs

Involvement of racially and culturally diverse participants as appropriate to the project

Organizational strength of the nonprofit applying for the grant

Special consideration will be given to projects that incorporate culturally and racially diverse artists.

Grant requests must not exceed $1,000, have to be matched dollar for dollar, and are to be spent on arts projects in the High Point area. Nonprofit organizations that receive local government funding (city or county) are not eligible to apply.

Grant applications may be mailed to the High Point Arts Council, Community Arts Project Grants, 121 S. Centennial St., High Point, NC 27260.

The grant application is also available in a Word format at http://highpointarts.org/arts/grants/community-arts-projects/. For information, contact Debbie Lumpkins at 336-889-2787, Ext. 22 or dlumpkins@highpointarts.org.

Honors

More than 280 students, including Calvin Biesecker and Olivia Stevens, both of High Point, have been accepted into the College of Charleston Honors College for the fall 2021 school year.

Biesecker’s major is undecided. Stevens plans to major in psychology and women’s and gender studies.

* * * *

Gold stars were awarded to cadets and students at The Citadel who achieved a 3.7 grade-point average or higher in the spring 2021 semester. Cadets and students who achieve gold star recognition also are placed on The Citadel’s dean’s list.

The nearly 550 cadets and students recognized for their academic achievements during the spring 2021 semester included these local students: Noah Pearson of Banner Elk, Colton Horvath of Clemmons, Jackson Gammons of High Point, Ian Jenkins of Kernersville, Trevor Mayes of Mooresville, Isaac Patterson of King and Jonathan Florian and Hadley White, both of Winston-Salem.

Send press releases to people@greensboro.com.

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