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Ask SAM: Can the Supreme Court reappoint Trump president?
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Ask SAM: Can the Supreme Court reappoint Trump president?

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Facebook says former President Donald Trump will be suspended from its platform until at least January 7th, 2023 -- two years from when he was initially suspended. CNN's Donie O'Sullivan reports.

Q: I’ve heard that Donald Trump’s friend Mike Lindell is going to go to the Supreme Court and ask them to remove Joe Biden and “reinstall” Trump as president by the end of August. Can he do that?

— D.F.

Answer: Daniel Prosterman, a history professor at Salem College, provided the answer and background.

“The Supreme Court receives several thousand legal requests, or petitions, to receive a case on appeal every year, and the Court only agrees to hear a small percentage of that total number.

“The petitions must be part of existing legal proceedings, rather than speeches or special requests for hearings. These factors make it unlikely that Mike Lindell would be heard by the Court.

“Furthermore, the US Constitution does not provide any governing body with the authority to reappoint a previous president to the highest office in the land. Rather, the Constitution specifies an order of succession — beginning with the vice president, then the Speaker of the House, and so forth — in the event that the president becomes unable to fulfill the duties of the presidency.”

Q: I just saw a sign for a half marathon today sponsored by Foothills Brewery, and remembered in the past that they blocked access to our home on Saturday morning. I checked the route and sure enough we’re blocked in again. Why can a business block access to our homes without notifying us? This is extremely annoying; if I hadn’t seen the posting, I would not have known. Our street is a cul de sac, so if Yorkshire Road is closed between Shoreland Road and Pine Valley Road we can’t access our property.

— B.B.

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Answer: Race sponsors are required to notify people who are affected by the race.

Kira Boyd, a spokeswoman for the Winston-Salem Police Department explained the process. “It is the event coordinator’s responsibility to notify all residents that will be affected by road closures due to an upcoming event.

“For this half marathon, the coordinator used USPS EDDM services to reach residents in the areas surrounding event routes. Signs have also been placed in affected areas.”

USPS EDDM is the Every Door Direct Mail service by the U.S. Postal Service and it can be used to send postcards to the residents along the route.

“If a resident’s street is blocked, they should tell the officer they are a resident and will be allowed to enter or exit when it is safe to do so,” Boyd said.

Q: Does the county have any plans for the soon-to-be-empty Clemmons Library?

— D.E.

Answer: Want to buy a library building? Damon Sanders-Pratt, a deputy Forsyth County manager, explained what will become of the building.

“The soon-to-be-former Clemmons Branch Library site located at 3554 Clemmons Road in the Village of Clemmons has been declared surplus and is for sale.

“Those interested in making an offer to purchase the property, may contact the County’s Property Manager, Kirby Robinson, at 336-703-2200 for details.”

Email: AskSAM@wsjournal.com

Online: journalnow.com/asksam

Write: Ask SAM, 418 N. Marshall St., Winston-Salem, NC 27101

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