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Grandmother of Hanes Park shooting suspect died as a result of stab wounds to head, neck and upper body, autopsy report said.
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Grandmother of Hanes Park shooting suspect died as a result of stab wounds to head, neck and upper body, autopsy report said.

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Hanes Park shooting suspect William Coleman Scott’s grandmother had multiple stab wounds, including one that went into her skull, that led to her death in June, according to an autopsy report released Wednesday.

Scott, 27, is facing two counts of first-degree murder in the death of his grandmother, Glenda Corriher, and his mother, Kim Scott. He is also charged with one count of attempted first-degree murder that stems from allegations that he shot up a police substation and then fired at police officers who chased him through Hanes Park. The shootout led to lockdowns of several nearby schools. Several roads near the park were closed.

Scott is in the Forsyth County Jail with no bond allowed on the first-degree murder charges and a $3 million bond for the attempted first-degree murder charge. He is scheduled to appear on Nov. 18 in Forsyth District Court, but nothing substantial will happen in his case until Forsyth County prosecutors seek indictments against him. The indictments would transfer the case to Forsyth Superior Court, where a trial date can be set. It will likely be more than a year before a trial is held or a plea deal is reached.

Local law-enforcement found the bodies of Scott’s mother and grandmother hours after police’s shootout with Scott, authorities said. Winston-Salem police found Corriher’s body in her home in the Tabor View condominium development off Polo Road. Neighbors have said Scott had lived with his grandmother for about a year.

Kim Scott’s body was found in her Clemmons home. Forsyth County Sheriff Bobby Kimbrough Jr. has said she had been shot. Her autopsy report has not been publicly released.

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Authorities have not said exactly when they were killed.

According to the autopsy report, Corriher died from “sharp force injuries of head, neck and upper extremities.” The autopsy report said that blunt trauma to her head was a contributing factor.

Corriher had stab wounds and cuts on her head and neck, with one wound entering below the right ear and going into the right jugular vein. Another wound went through her forehead, the autopsy said.

Corriher also had lacerations on her head, including one associated with a skull fracture, and there were multiple cuts on her hands and forearms, the autopsy said. She also had several bruises on her lower legs, abdomen and shoulders.

The chain of events that ultimately led to Scott’s arrest started at 3:34 p.m. June 14, a Monday, when a man, later identified by authorities as Scott, fired more than a dozen shots at a police substation on North Point Boulevard. Officers pursued Scott, and Sgt. Peter T. Watkins of the Winston-Salem Police Department, saw the car Scott was driving on University Parkway near Northwest Boulevard. He chased Scott’s car, and police said body-camera footage showed Scott firing his gun at Watkins and other police officers as they chased him on Northwest Boulevard.

The chase ended in front of Reynolds High School’s gymnasium. Police said Scott fired several times from a semiautomatic rifle into Watkins’ police car. Watkins fired back with his AR-15 rifle, police said.

Scott then dropped the rifle and officers chased him into Hanes Park, where police said Scott fired a handgun at officers. Watkins and two other police officers — Lt. Lee S. Wright and Cpl. James O. Singletary — fired back. Scott was struck.

The officers were placed on administrative duty. As is routine, the N.C. State Bureau of Investigation is investigating the shooting. Forsyth County District Attorney Jim O’Neill has not yet announced a decision about the use of force in this case.

336-727-7326

@mhewlettWSJ

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