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Forsyth County didn't see a huge increase in eviction filings on Monday. But landlords won overwhelmingly in hearings.
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Forsyth County didn't see a huge increase in eviction filings on Monday. But landlords won overwhelmingly in hearings.

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A jump in evictions filings was expected across the county after the CDC moratorium expired over the weekend.

But at least in Forsyth County, that didn't happen. 

Dan Rose, an activist with Housing Justice Now, said he was surprised there wasn't a flood of eviction filings on Monday. But the situation could change rapidly in the coming days, he said. 

And more importantly, Rose said, 146 eviction hearings were held Monday in Small Claims Court. Out of those 146 hearings, 98 cases resulted in evictions. There were 46 continuances and two dismissals. In other words, 67.1% of the cases heard Monday resulted in evictions.

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That, Rose said, is a change from what he saw last year, when landlords won evictions about 40% to 50% of the time.

Landlords who did file for eviction on Monday cited nonpayment of rent. When the CDC moratorium was in effect, landlords cited other reasons for evicting a tenant, Rose said. 

The data show that the number of eviction filings in Forsyth County dropped dramatically starting in the spring of 2020, after the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic led to the imposition of a series of eviction moratoriums designed to keep people from losing their housing in the midst of the pandemic.

During the 15 months prior to March 2020, before the first moratorium was put in place, Forsyth County averaged 880 eviction filings per month. In the 15-month period from April 2020 to the end of June, there was an average of 262 eviction filings per month in Forsyth. That's a decline of about 70%.

Evictions did not stop altogether over most of the period because landlords could still evict for criminal behavior, lease violations or other factors outside non-payment of rent arising from the impacts of COVID.

336-727-7326

@mhewlettWSJ

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