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How you can help fight the hunger crisis resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic
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How you can help fight the hunger crisis resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic

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How you can help fight the hunger crisis resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic

A worker distributes orange juice at a food shelf organized by The Campaign Against Hunger in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn on April 14, 2020 in New York City. Food insecurity is one of many economic threats posed by the ongoing coronavirus crisis, which has shuttered nonessential businesses and caused unemployment claims to rise dramatically.

The coronavirus is leading to a secondary pandemic — hunger.

The need for emergency food has exploded since March of 2020. According to an Oxfam report, this hunger crisis could soon kill more people each day than the infection itself.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates about 821 million people were suffering from chronic undernourishment before the pandemic. Globally this hunger crisis has already been exacerbated by climate change, existing conflicts, and inequalities. But now, coupled with COVID-19, people worldwide have hunger and malnutrition to worry about even more. Here is how you can help:

Volunteer

Look for volunteer opportunities at your local food bank or community kitchen. By volunteering locally, you support families and individuals so they can use their money to pay bills and other expenses while still having access to healthy foods.

Buy local

Whenever you buy locally grown food, you directly support smallholder farmers in your own community. Many of these growers generously donate their unsold and unused food to neighbors in need. You can also reduce your carbon footprint by buying foods that are in season.

Donate to an anti-hunger initiative

Impact Your World has compiled a list of non-profits around the world who are helping fight the coronavirus-related hunger crisis. Your donation to any of these organizations will go directly to support those efforts.

Click here to donate.

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