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The Readers' Forum: Standardizing Standard Time
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The Readers’ Forum

The Readers' Forum: Standardizing Standard Time

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Standardizing Standard Time

I eagerly awaited returning to Eastern Standard Time (ST) on Nov. 7. As an early riser, I’m happy when sunrise greets me. But when Daylight Saving Time (DST) drags on into near-winter, this solar greeting comes an hour too late for me. Thus, I’ve monitored the long debate over the merits of DST vs. Standard Time zones. (See AskSAM, March 14 and Nov. 6 and “Our view: Time to stop falling back and springing forward,” March 17.) A few things stand out.

First, a growing consensus is against resetting clocks twice a year. Health, labor productivity and education, to name a few things, take hits following these time changes. The question becomes whether to stick to DST or ST all year long.

Second, for unclear reasons, some American politicians are pushing year-long DST. Several states already have legislated year-long DST should Congress permit. The cheerleaders for this ignore that DST may not even save energy, its stated goal, and that it may disrupt normal sleep patterns (see Journal editorial, March 17).

Third, a minor observation: Many calendars reminded us on Nov. 7 that “Daylight Saving Time Ends,” not “Standard Time Begins.” Does this promote an unconscious bias that DST is normative?

Finally, despite the DST bandwagon, a plurality of Americans favors Standard Time (“Time for a change?” Nov. 2, 2019). Do they sense that waking every winter day to an extra hour of gloomy darkness, imposed by a DST fiat, would take some joy out of life?

Donald Frey

Winston-Salem

Expel Gosar

I’m sure a lot of your readers scoffed when you warned about violent rhetoric and actions rising from Republicans (“Americans must denounce violence,” Oct. 31), but events seem to be supporting your view.

Republican Rep. Paul Gosar was already known to be unhinged. He’s the legislator who is so extreme and dishonest that his own siblings warned the public not to vote for him.

On Monday, he tweeted an anime video depicting himself killing Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and attacking President Biden with swords.

I know a lot of conservatives don’t like “AOC,” and a lot will downplay his action, like they’ve done with the Jan. 6 insurrection. But this is a member of Congress depicting himself murdering a co-worker. If any of us did something like this, we’d be fired.

Gosar is allegedly one of the organizers of the Jan. 6 insurrection. He was recorded talking to some of the protesters about receiving a “blanket pardon” after the attack. (Why would they need a pardon if they weren’t expected to do something illegal?)

Gosar is one more example of the movement toward violence that some Republicans are not only tolerating, but encouraging — in preparation for another coup attempt?

Our North Carolina delegation should speak out against Gosar, but I doubt any of them possess the integrity that would require. He should have been expelled from the House and sent home before posting his unhinged threat toward AOC. He definitely should be expelled now.

William B. Perry

Winston-Salem

Just one tree

Too much CO2 in the atmosphere has been identified as a contributor to climate change. Therefore, reducing the concentration of CO2 in the air would help reverse this global problem. Here’s how the average citizen can help: plant more trees.

We all know that trees remove CO2 from the atmosphere. They also beautify our surroundings and provide shade and habitat for wildlife.

Some years ago, I began rescuing saplings from places where they stood little chance of surviving, such as flower beds, and planting them wherever I could find space where they would grow to maturity. This doesn’t cost much if anything. Any one of these saplings that grows to a full-size tree will absorb CO2 for generations. Since I have exhausted all available space around our house, I am donating them to friends, planting them around our neighborhood and along greenways.

Imagine how much CO2 could be sequestered if residents of the Triad rescued just one tree.

Alberto Carrillo

Winston-Salem

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About billionaires flying to space: Why don’t those billionaires help people on Earth? Isn’t there enough hunger and poverty here? People need help here. Now, not chasing after some distant star.

Too many Republicans are now flirting with violence in response to former President Trump’s Big Lie. They have a responsibility to walk it back before it explodes.

The writer of the Nov. 20 letter “Billionaires in space” needs to understand that people who have worked hard, established thriving companies and employ thousands of people deserve to have some latitude with their money.

COVID cases are surging across the U.S., including in Vermont, where 72% of residents, the highest percentage in the U.S., is vaccinated. I know this because I watch CNN and read The Washington Post and the Winston-Salem Journal.

As the season changes with a beautiful array of falling leaves and bright sunny treetops reflecting that natural beauty, my hope is that our political environment would shift from rage toward each other to reason for each other to advance the common good.

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