Simplicity

After watching President Trump for three-plus years, I have come to the conclusion that he likes things simple.

So do I. Doesn’t everyone? The problem is that running a country isn’t simple. It’s complicated and requires input from many sources, with a willingness and ability to sort out issues and facts, then arrive at the best solutions.

Trump, on the other hand, seems to think he knows all, and isn’t bashful about telling us so. His view appears to be that all problems are nails and all solutions are hammers. That’s real simple.

The best evidence of this has been his approach to the COVID-19 pandemic. At its onset, Trump declared the pandemic a war, and that he was the wartime president. This was his trial to see how he could deal with a very complicated problem.

His first action was to form a White House Task Force to address the issue, smart move. However, instead of letting it do its job, he intervened during the press conferences, showboated, contradicted the experts and presented ridiculous solutions like injecting disinfectants into COVID patients. “It will just go away” was another. As a result of his lack of leadership, we are in the worst possible place with the pandemic.

It didn’t have to be this way. The toll in lives and damage to his/our precious economy is inexcusable.

Unfortunately, our wartime commander in chief has been MIA. Maybe Trump’s campaign slogan should be, “I don’t let the facts confuse me.”

Ken Burkel

Clemmons

A national day of prayer

As we Christians know, fervent prayer moves the hands of God. In Joshua Chapter 6, God delivered Jericho into Israel’s hands and they did not even need to fight. Likewise, in 2 Chronicles Chapter 20 when three enemy armies came to wage war against King Jehoshaphat, he “proclaimed a fast throughout all Judah … and gathered together to seek the Lord.”

The world is in a war! COVID-19 has disrupted our way of life and everything else in the world. Is it possible we have forgotten that God is in charge and in control of everything and everyone? Have we gotten so far away from what is morally right and turned a blind eye to what He intended and that there are consequences for our behavior? Look at the Flood brought on by the corruption of mankind (Genesis 6-7); Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 19).

What about it, pastors, ministers and lay people of our community and surrounding area? Can you come together and organize a time of national prayer to petition God to rid the world of COVID-19? It certainly worked for Joshua and King Jehoshaphat. Nothing else seems to be working.

Goldia Anderson

Winston-Salem

Wartime president

Wartime President Trump, 1941:

Dec. 8, 1941: President Trump speaks about Pearl Harbor: “All communications about Japan must go through me. There was a minor incident in Pearl Harbor yesterday. Damage was minimum. Only a few Americans were hurt. I spoke to Emperor Hirohito. We had a wonderful conversation. He said he liked me. He explained that a few planes flew off course and did some minor damage. He apologized. I believed him. Everything will be back to normal soon.”

Feb. 12, 1942: “Reports of Japanese invasion forces off our West Coast are a hoax. I ordered our Navy and Coast Guard to move to the Atlantic. If we don’t look for Japanese forces, there won’t be any. I ordered Army and Marine forces to relocate to the East Coast for ‘our’ use.”

April 18, 1942: “Reports of Japanese forces reaching eastern America are fake news. They will be gone by June. Red state governors should welcome our guests. Blue state governors should protect us.”

July 4, 1942: Donald Trump, president of Japan West: “It’s so sad that there is no longer a United States of America. I take no responsibility. The blue state governors did not defend us. Tomorrow, I leave for Japan where I will break ground for the new Trump Tokyo Tower. After which, I will dine with Emperor Hirohito. It will be a great trip. He said he likes me.”

If Donald Trump had been president in 1941, we would all be speaking Japanese.

Roger Lamar

Winston-Salem

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