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The Readers' Forum: Tuesday letters

The Readers' Forum: Tuesday letters

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Demanding accountability

Earlier this month, around 20 peaceful protesters were arrested in Winston-Salem for standing in the street. The hypocrisy of these arrests is in contrast to police behavior earlier.

Since May, the Winston-Salem Police Department has protected demonstrators at over 30 rallies, including rallies inside Hanes Mall, blocking the Five Points intersection and standing on the highways. All of these seem more disruptive than peaceful protesters outside the Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office.

Perhaps the noteworthy difference between unpunished, earlier protests and the more recent protests is that now things are closer to home. Now that the Winston-Salem Police Department’s own culpability is on the line, these protests are disruptive in a way they were not for six weeks prior.

The first night of protests over John Neville’s death, all four arrested were speakers at the protest. There were other people in the street when these four were arrested, yet they were left alone. It is clear that now that the protests have changed from a general cry against racial injustice to demanding accountability from our local police force, they are suddenly viewed with less tolerance.

It is hard to view this as anything other than police willfully using their powers as retaliation meant to demoralize and frighten organizers. It is hard to feel like these arrests are anything other than punishment for protesters demanding the very accountability that they have been promised. It is hard to see this as anything other than further proof of a corrupt and inherently unjust system.

Kiralina Soare

Winston-Salem

My privilege

I was privileged to be born into a family with a mother and a father who were married. Some 70% of Black children do not enjoy that privilege.

I was privileged to have two parents who worked and contributed to the economic well-being of our family. Regrettably, only about 30% of Black children enjoy that privilege.

I was privileged to have parents who recognized the importance of education and insisted that I graduate from high school. Currently, 40% of Black males drop out of high school.

I was privileged to have a father who served as a role model, a provider and a disciplinarian. Only 30% of Black children enjoy that privilege.

I was privileged to be able to graduate from college. My parents didn’t, but they encouraged it and, with two incomes, it was possible. Only a third of Black males enroll in college and only 42% of those who enroll actually graduate.

These factors have led to more poverty and crime in black neighborhoods where the murder rate among Blacks is almost eight times higher than among whites; where 93% of Blacks are killed by other Blacks.

Having reviewed my role in “white privilege” injustice, I take responsibility for preventing Blacks from succeeding. They have played no role in what has led to the conditions in which they find themselves. I could say the collapse of the Black family unit is the primary culprit, but I won’t. If I did, I would surely be labeled a racist.

Mike Phillips

Advance

Don’t listen to Trump

The White House is implementing a concerted effort to undermine President Trump’s own official, Dr. Anthony Fauci — in the middle of a damn pandemic! Trump could just fire him — I’m sure he’d insist that he had the authority — but instead, he’s looking for a fall guy for his own failings.

It wasn’t Fauci who told us on Feb. 26 that “You have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero.”

I don’t believe a word Trump says and no one should. He exhibits all the worst qualities of humanity from habitual deceit to jealousy. He can’t stand for Fauci to be more respected than he is. And if he gets his way now, forcing schools to open to improve his election chances, our children will pay for it.

Trump should resign, but he won’t. Senate Republicans should stand up to him, but we already know they won’t. We’re on our own here.

Don’t send your children back to school and don’t listen to Trump.

Douglas Carithers

Winston-Salem

Please submit letters online, with full name, address and telephone number, to Letters@wsjournal.com. Letters are subject to editing and are limited to 250 words. For more guidelines and advice on writing letters, go to journalnow.com/site/forms/online_services/letter/

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