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PHOENIX (AP) — U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema is growing increasingly isolated from some of her party’s most influential officials and donors after playing a key role in scuttling voting rights legislation that many Democrats consider essential to preserving democracy.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Staring at midterm elections that could cost them control of Congress, Democrats are trying to sculpt a 2022 legislative agenda that would generate achievements and reassure voters that they’re addressing pocketbook problems and can govern competently.

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LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Indicted U.S. Rep. Jeff Fortenberry's political fortunes took a major hit Friday when two of Nebraska's most prominent Republicans withdrew their longtime support for him and endorsed a state lawmaker who hopes to unseat the nine-term congressman in the GOP primary.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Henry Cuellar is an increasingly rare politician in the Democratic Party, a conservative-leaning lawmaker whose unapologetic defense of gun rights and the energy industry during his 17 years in Congress long delighted his Texas constituents.

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LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Republicans sued to block the state's new congressional map, saying it is constitutionally flawed because of population deviations, too much splitting of municipal lines and the carving up of “communities of interest.”

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MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A Republican Wisconsin state lawmaker was recorded on video saying that Republicans need to “cheat like the Democrats” to win elections and that he’d like to punch Democratic Gov. Tony Evers over pandemic restrictions.

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The winners of lawsuits challenging Ohio's gerrymandered legislative maps submitted their own plan for new lines to the state's redistricting panel Friday, signaling a possible path to ending legal wrangling as 2022 elections approach.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats were picking up the pieces Thursday following the collapse of their top-priority voting rights legislation, with some shifting their focus to a narrower bipartisan effort to repair laws Donald Trump exploited in his bid to overturn the 2020 election.

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ATLANTA (AP) — The storm over how Georgia’s elections are run is far from abating, as Republicans echoing former President Donald Trump’s falsehoods about a stolen 2020 election make new proposals atop last year's state law that set a benchmark for restrictive GOP voting changes nationwide.

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HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Getting rid of the filibuster rule in the U.S. Senate is emerging as perhaps the most important issue in Pennsylvania’s competitive Democratic primary for an open Senate seat, as the party struggles to use its majority in Washington to advance its agenda.

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MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin's Republican Assembly leader on Thursday disciplined a lawmaker who falsely claimed that former President Donald Trump won the battleground state and that he wanted to award the state's electoral votes to Trump, even though that is not possible.

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Republican-led Tennessee Senate's ethics committee on Thursday recommended removing a Democratic senator from office because of her recent wire fraud conviction, pressing ahead over her objections that she had short notice of the hearing and is still awaiting sentencing.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin assistant district attorney has said state or federal prosecutors should look into a complaint filed a year ago alleging that Republicans committed fraud when they submitted false paperwork saying former President Donald Trump had won the battleground state.

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MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Wisconsin Assembly approved a package of Republican-authored bills on Thursday that would dramatically expand gun rights in the state, moving forward with the proposals even though Democratic Gov. Tony Evers will almost certainly veto them.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital to protecting democracy collapsed when two senators refused to join their own party in changing Senate rules to overcome a Republican filibuster after a raw, emotional debate.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital to protecting democracy collapsed late Wednesday when two senators refused to join their own party in changing Senate rules to overcome a Republican filibuster after a raw, emotional debate.

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