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Authorities say one person was killed and another four people were shot in Chicago on Thursday. Police spokesperson Tom Ahern says the shooting occurred at about 10:40 p.m. on the Near North Side. The Chicago Sun-Times reported that one person died and the other four were taken to local hospitals in conditions ranging from serious to critical. Police did not release their names or ages. No additional details about the circumstances behind the shooting or any suspects has been released. An investigation is ongoing.

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Relatives of the 10 Black people massacred in a Buffalo supermarket are pleading with the nation to confront and stop racist violence. Their agony poured out Thursday in the tears of a 12-year-old child, Jaques “Jake” Patterson, who lost his father. The child covered his face with his hands as his mother said, “His heart is broken.” She spoke at a press conference with civil rights activist Rev. Al Sharpton. Earlier Thursday, the white man accused in the killings, 18-year-old Payton Gendron, silently faced a murder indictment in court. Authorities are investigating the possibility of hate crime and terrorism charges against him.

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Police say one person was killed and another injured in a shooting after a high school graduation ceremony had ended at Middle Tennessee State University. Police confirmed the shooting Wednesday night after the Riverdale High School graduation at Murphy Center, an on-campus arena. Murfreesboro police say a 17-year-old was arrested and charged with first-degree murder Thursday afternoon. The person who died was identified as 18-year-old Hasani Brewer. The 17-year-old injured victim is in stable condition. Police said a preliminary investigation shows Brewer and the 17-year-old victim got into a fight, and the shooter opened fire near a tennis court outside the arena as people were leaving.

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Officials say a Chicago police officer shot and wounded a 13-year-old boy who fled after he was pulled over in a car that had been involved in an earlier carjacking. The agency that investigates officer-involved shootings in Chicago says the shooting happened Wednesday night. Officers pulled the vehicle over and one of them shot the teen as he fled on foot. No gun was recovered and a second person in the car escaped. The night before a person in neighboring Oak Park jumped into a car with a 3-year-old boy and sped off. Minutes later, the driver jumped out and left the uninjured child behind before climbing into another car — the one the teen was in Wednesday night.

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One of the four people who died in a fire at a Massachusetts apartment building last weekend had filed a defamation lawsuit against right-wing radio host Alex Jones and his InfoWars website in 2018, alleging they falsely identified him as the gunman in a massacre at a Florida high school. A lawyer for 29-year-old Marcel Fontaine confirmed Thursday that his client died in Saturday's fire in Worcester. The attorney said the lawsuit will continue of behalf of Fontaine's estate. The lawyer said Fontaine's bravery in suing Jones inspired parents of children who died in the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting in Connecticut to take legal action against Jones.

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The nation’s oldest civil rights organization said it will propose a sweeping plan meant to protect Black Americans from white supremacist violence in response to a hate-fueled massacre that killed 10 Black people in Buffalo, New York, last weekend. In a plan first shared with The Associated Press, the NAACP suggests a policy approach to stopping future acts of anti-Black domestic terrorism that involves law enforcement, business regulation and gun control. The plan calls for holding accountable any corporation that is complicit in the spread of bigotry and racism through news media and on social platforms, for enacting gun violence prevention measures that keep mass-casualty weapons out of the hands of would-be assailants and for reforming police practices.

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An Illinois man faces up to three years in prison after being convicted of illegally giving his son an assault-style rifle he later used to shoot and kill four people in 2018 at a Waffle House in Tennessee. A judge convicted Jeffrey Reinking last week of illegal delivery of a firearm to a person who had been treated for mental illness within the past five years. The Journal Star of Peoria reports Tazewell County prosecutors argued that Reinking knew his son, Travis Reinking, had undergone mental health treatment. Jeffrey Reinking’s attorney argued that his client didn’t know his son had been treated. Travis Reinking surrendered his guns to his father, who later returned them to him at some point before the deadly shooting in Nashville.

Police in North Carolina's largest city say a man has been arrested for shooting into a transit bus, the second such incident in the city in three months. The Charlotte Observer reports Charlotte-Mecklenburg police said 37-year-old Jason Wright is facing multiple charges, including  carrying a concealed gun and possession of a firearm by a felon. Just after midnight on Wednesday, officers responded to a call on Nations Ford Road on the city’s south side. A driver for Charlotte Area Transit System told officers that an unidentified man fired shots into the bus while it was stopped. No passengers were on the bus, and the driver wasn’t injured.

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The man accused of opening fire on a Southern California church congregation because of his political hatred for Taiwan sent a newspaper a seven-volume diary before the attack. The Chinese-language World Journal bureau in the Los Angeles area said it received the stacks of photocopied pages and a flash drive on Monday — a day after authorities say David Chou opened fire on people at a luncheon at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. The paper said the title referred to a “destroying" angel opposed to Taiwan's independence from China. The newspaper's attorney tells The Orange County Register he will turn them over over to police when he receives a subpoena. Chou is charged with murder and attempted murder.

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Officials in California's Orange County are still trying to determine why a gunman opened fire in a Taiwanese Presbyterian church in Laguna Woods. They say 68-year-old David Chou, who has links to both Taiwan and China, was motivated by political hatred against Taiwan. The church he chose belongs to a denomination that is renowned and revered in the Taiwanese American community. The Presbyterian Church of Taiwan is the country's largest and oldest Protestant denomination. They have been known to promote democracy and self-determination for Taiwan. They have also been credited with romanizing the Taiwanese alphabet. Most Taiwanese Christians in the U.S. are Presbyterians.

A federal grand jury in Georgia has brought hate crime charges against a white man accused of shooting into two convenience stores and targeting the people there because of their race. Clayton County Police said Larry Edward Foxsworth of Jonesboro said it himself, telling officers “this is a hate crime and this is a targeted hit.” No one was hurt in the shootings last July. U.S. Attorney Ryan K. Buchanan in Atlanta says nobody should have to be afraid to shop or go to work or have to worry about violent attacks because of the color of their skin.

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A prosecutor says a southern Indiana police officer who fatally shot a stranded motorist who opened fire on him was justified in doing so. The News and Tribune reports Harrison County Prosecutor Otto Schalk said during a news conference Wednesday that the Palmyra Police Department reserve police officer nearly was struck by a shotgun blast fired by 31-year-old Justin Moore, of Owensboro, Kentucky. Indiana State Police on Wednesday identified the officer as Reserve Officer Zachary Holly. The shotgun blast Monday night killed 24-year-old Jacob Tyler McClanahan, a volunteer firefighter from Corydon, Indiana, who had stopped to help. It remains unclear why Moore opened fire on the others.

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The House has passed legislation that would devote more federal resources to preventing domestic terrorism in response to the racist mass shooting in Buffalo, New York. The vote Wednesday night was along party lines, 222-203, with one Republican, Illinois' Adam Kinzinger, in favor. The House passed a similar measure in 2020 only to have it languish in the Senate. But Democrats are pushing for a broader federal focus on domestic terrorism as they lack support in the Senate to move ahead with gun-control legislation. Numerous Republican lawmakers opposed bolstering the Justice Department's domestic surveillance efforts.

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The man accused of opening fire on a Southern California church congregation of mainly elderly people because of his political hatred for Taiwan sent a newspaper a seven-volume diary before the attack. The Chinese-language World Journal bureau in the Los Angeles area said it received the stacks of photocopied pages and a flash drive on Monday — a day after David Chou allegedly opened fire on people at a luncheon at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. The paper didn't report details of what was in the handwritten Chinese pages but the title referred to a “destroying angel" opposed to Taiwan's independence from China. The documents were turned over to police. Chou is charged with killing one man and wounding seven other people. He has not yet entered a plea.

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A 911 dispatcher is on leave and may lose her job after allegedly hanging up on an supermarket employee hiding during this weekend’s shooting rampage in Buffalo, New York. A spokesperson for the Erie County executive said “termination will be sought” for the dispatcher at a disciplinary hearing later this month. An employee at the supermarket where 10 Black people were killed by a white gunman on Saturday told The Buffalo News that she was whispering during the 911 call because she feared the shooter would hear her. The employee alleges the dispatcher shouted at her, asked why she was whispering — then hung up.

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Friends and colleagues of Dr. John Cheng say they were not surprised the quiet, kind and calm sports medicine physician saved others by rushing a gunman firing on a Southern California church luncheon. The 52-year-old father who was raised in East Texas was known for doing all he could to protect people. He even had taken courses to prepare for such a horrific event, concerned about the growing number of mass shootings. Active shooter experts say that preparedness combined with Cheng’s serene disposition likely gave him a proclivity for acting heroically. Cheng was killed and five were wounded in Sunday's shooting. Authorities credit him for saving perhaps dozens of lives.

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Shortly before police say he opened fire, the white gunman accused of killing 10 Black people at a Buffalo, New York, supermarket allowed a small group of people to see his long-simmering plans for the attack, which he had been chronicling for months in a private, online diary. Discord, the chat platform where 18-year-old Payton Gendron kept the diary, confirmed Wednesday that an invitation to access his private writings was sent to the group about a half-hour before Saturday’s attack at Tops Friendly Market, which he live-streamed on another online service, and that some of them accepted.

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The massacre at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, is still under investigation, but here are the basics. A white gunman in body armor killed 10 Black shoppers and workers and wounded another Black person and two white people. Federal officials are investigating the shooting as a hate crime. Police said the 13 victims, including the wounded, ranged in age from 20 to 86. The accused gunman, 18-year-old Payton Gendron, has pleaded not guilty to murder.

Eleven attempted murder charges were dropped and a 44-year-old ex-convict pleaded guilty to a single felony charge in a deadly shootout that authorities say involved at least five shooters at a Las Vegas lounge. Lee Frank Wilson admitted Wednesday he was a felon in possession of a prohibited firearm. Defense attorney Joshua Tomsheck says he's expected to face up to 54 months in prison at sentencing Sept. 14. Authorities said at least 12 people were shot and 33-year-old Demetreus Beard died in the Feb. 26 gunfire at the hookah club off the Las Vegas Strip. Wilson has been the only person arrested. Tomsheck says Wilson was a badly wounded victim in the shooting, and that Wilson and Beard were friends.

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The wife of a New Hampshire man accused of killing her co-worker after he discovered they were texting — and then forcing her to behead him — denied shooting him, and testified that both were brutally assaulted by her husband in the hours leading up to the death that night. Britany Barron said her husband, Armando Barron, choked and punched her and eventually put his gun into her mouth. That was in September 2020, not long before the two left the house to go to the park where he allegedly used her phone to tell the co-worker to meet her there. Armando Barron pleaded not guilty and his lawyer says Britany shot the co-worker, which she denied.

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A former football player for the University of Alabama at Birmingham has been sentenced to life in prison in the death of a nursing student shot during an online sale that went bad. Carlos Stephens was convicted in April of capital murder in the 2020 shooting death of 20-year-old Destiny Washington. A judge sentenced the 24-year-old Wednesday. The shooting happened on UAB’s campus during the sale of $90 AirPods. Stephens claimed he fired in self-defense after Washington’s boyfriend pulled a gun first. Washington’s parents stood before the court and delivered an emotional impact statement before the sentence was handed down.

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul is touting a package of executive orders and gun control bills in the aftermath of a racist attack on a Buffalo supermarket. The Democrat's executive orders would require state police to seek court orders to keep guns away from people who might pose a threat to themselves or others. New York is among states that have a so-called “red flag” law. It allows law enforcement officials to petition a court to take away someone’s firearms if they are potentially dangerous because of a mental health problem. Appearing with the governor Wednesday, the Rev. Al Sharpton said racism and violence pose an “existential threat to this country.”

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A prosecutor says he will only decide whether to charge a white Michigan police officer in last month’s fatal shooting of Patrick Lyoya, a Black man, after he finishes discussing it with experts. Kent County prosecutor Chris Becker acknowledged in a statement Wednesday that the “investigation appears to be moving painstakingly slowly,” six weeks after Grand Rapids Officer Christopher Schurr shot Lyoya in the back of the head during a struggle. However, he says it's “imperative” that he reviews all the facts and evidence before making a charging decision. Schurr killed Lyoya on April 4 during a physical struggle. Video shows he demanded that Lyoya let go of his police Taser before he shot him.

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